Tag Archives: Engineering

Met-L-Flo Kids – The Homework Advantage

Talk about a simple homework assignment where dad takes over!

Brian McNamara’s son recently had a science project due – this is what “he” turned in!

How often do you see a 4th grader bring in a to scale model of NASA’s Mars Rover?

This part was produced on our SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) machine. SLS is a 3D printing process using powder based nylon material. One of the biggest benefits to SLS is the ability to build fully assembled complex parts such as The Rover.

 

The Casting Process

Have you ever had a project where an SLA part wouldn’t fit the bill, but you weren’t sure which direction to turn next? There are many prototyping options available beyond plastic SLAs. If you need more than one of the same part, the casting process can be an excellent alternative. Met-L-Flo casts prototype pieces in urethane, rubber and silicone. This option is offered if you need a short run for testing parts, mock fit up, marketing strategies, product development, tradeshow pieces for exploration at your booth, or even as giveaways. This process is particularly beneficial for larger quantities, typically resulting in a per part cost savings.

Example: The management team will be reviewing a new design, and you want each of the ten team members to have a prototype in their hands.

This process begins with printing the 3D data, typically in an SLA to produce a master pattern. That pattern is then molded in silicone to produce a tool that will be used to cast the desired number of parts. There are a wide variety of casting materials available to fit your project needs. The material can be run in soft durometers, or harder durometers to simulate ABS, HIPS, or Rubber. We can also create a plastic tool to produce silicone parts. These parts have options after they are cast as well. We can texturize them or paint them to give them a production look. They can be made paint ready for you to paint. If inserts are required, we can install the inserts or make sure everything is cleaned up for you to install them. Imagine, a finished part to give to your management team that they can touch, feel, and evaluate hands on.

One of our customers graciously gave us the green light to share photos of their casting project with you. This client needed something flexible to fit over their phone. After reviewing the geometry we recommended a rubber urethane. We were given the order to proceed. We made several in a soft rubber then sent them out for evaluation. After reviewing, the customer wanted something that was a bit more rigid. One of the benefits of using this process is the mold can be used with several different materials. Therefore we were able to change material durometers and meet their new expectation without needing new tooling.

Give us a call to hear about casting options that will work for you!Combo

Real World Applications of 3D Printing

As one would expect—day in and day out—use of equipment takes its toll. Preventative maintenance programs are a must, but at the end of the day… sometimes things just break.

Recently, our liquid honing machine, started acting up. A honing machine looks a lot like a sand blast cabinet, but works through a combination of air pressure and water solution pressure. Great for plastics, this action is gentle and works well to clean up rough edges and leaves a nice consistent finish surface appearance.

Unfortunately, our honer was not functioning properly. At first we believed the air pressure was the culprit. However, after disassembly of the inbound air line, it was determined that the foot activated electrical solenoid which allows air passage was bad. The rubber diaphragm inside the solenoid had deteriorated from age. We got on the horn with the honer’s manufacturer in search of the solenoid. They located a solenoid for us and overnighted the piece. We received and immediately installed the part. The results were better, but still not 100%.

We moved to the water pressure side of the equation. The inbound water is supplied via a regular hook-up similar to that on your washing machine. However, that water is constantly regurgitated in the bottom hopper to ensure water and cutting media are mixed. The process is driven by an electric motor and a mechanical water pump. The inconsistent “surface appearance” of our parts lead us to believe the water pump was not performing its job. After disconnecting the water, air and electric, we began to disassemble the water pump. In short order, we identified the pump impeller had broken off the main shaft. Back on the horn with the manufacturer. The new complication became a 2 to 3 month wait for the new impeller—not an option. The honer is used several hours daily. One of the things I believe we do well at Met-L-Flo is find internal solutions. We decided to build our own impeller! Why not… it’s made out of plastic. With some estimated measurements and a little CAD magic, we were able to reverse engineer the part. Once we had the CAD, we were ready to build. We decided to build the part in our FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) machine for strength and durability.

While the part was being built, we cleaned up the pump body and chased all threads to insure an easy re-assembly with all new stainless steel hardware. Reassembly is now done and it’s time to test….

The results are excellent!

We can once again provide our customers with the quality parts that we are committed to deliver…Honing group

Met-L-Flo, Inc. Newsletter – December 2014

Click here to view the fully formatted newsletter.

Puzzle2

Deck the Halls

1. How many actual gifts are mentioned in the song Twelve Days of Christmas?

A. 144
B. 364
C. 155
D. 284

2. In 1836, what was the first state to officially recognize Christmas as a holiday?

A. Alabama
B. Pennsylvania
C. Virginia
D. Georgia

3. What year was the poinsettia plant brought to America from Mexico?

A. 1865
B. 1837
C. 1824
D. 1829

4. Which President was the first to decorate on official White House Christmas tree?

A. Lincoln
B. Kennedy
C. Pierce
D. Nixon

5. What state has a town named Santa Claus.

A. Illinois
B. Indiana
C. Wisconsin
D. Iowa

Please send your guesses/requests for the correct matches to:
newsletter@met-l-flo.com

If you’ve got an idea for a great trivia teaser, please submit it to the email above for possible inclusion in a future addition.

Answers from the last trivia:
Fall Fun

1. In what year did Americans celebrate two Thanksgivings? C. 1939
2. Where did Jack O’lanterns originate? C. Ireland
3. Thunder in the fall fortells what? C. Cold winter

The Casting Process

Have you ever had a project where an SLA part wouldn’t fit the bill, but you weren’t sure which direction to turn next? There are many prototyping options available beyond plastic SLAs. If you need more than one of the same part, the casting process can be an excellent alternative. Met-L-Flo casts prototype pieces in urethane, rubber and silicone. This option is offered if you need a short run for testing parts, mock fit up, marketing strategies, product development, tradeshow pieces for exploration at your booth, or even as giveaways. This process is particularly beneficial for larger quantities, typically resulting in a per part cost savings.

Example: The management team will be reviewing a new design, and you want each of the ten team members to have a prototype in their hands.

This process begins with printing the 3D data, typically in an SLA to produce a master pattern. That pattern is then molded in silicone to produce a tool that will be used to cast the desired number of parts. There are a wide variety of casting materials available to fit your project needs. The material can be run in soft durometers, or harder durometers to simulate ABS, HIPS, or Rubber. We can also create a plastic tool to produce silicone parts. These parts have options after they are cast as well. We can texturize them or paint them to give them a production look. They can be made paint ready for you to paint. If inserts are required, we can install the inserts or make sure everything is cleaned up for you to install them. Imagine, a finished part to give to your management team that they can touch, feel, and evaluate hands on.

One of our customers graciously gave us the green light to share photos of their casting project with you. This client needed something flexible to fit over their phone. After reviewing the geometry we recommended a rubber urethane. We were given the order to proceed. We made several in a soft rubber then sent them out for evaluation. After reviewing, the customer wanted something that was a bit more rigid. One of the benefits of using this process is the mold can be used with several different materials. Therefore we were able to change material durometers and meet their new expectation without needing new tooling.

Give us a call to hear about casting options that will work for you!

Combo

New Material Offering

Earlier this year, one of our customers presented us with a challenge. They not only needed fast prototypes, the parts had to meet specific critical properties to satisfy intense testing requirements. Once we took a look at the property requirements, the search began. It quickly became apparent that their target numbers for Tensile and Flexural modulus were virtually unheard of in traditional prototyping materials.

Then, Carl mentioned Windform.

Windform is a 3D printing/SLS material that blows away the competition in terms of ultimate strength per density. It’s the brainchild of CRP Technology who have been working with motorsports companies since the 1970s. Since then they’ve developed various types of Windform with Windform XT 2.0 being the most popular and “Top Level” material. It is a carbon fiber reinforced composite material. Windform has been used in industries ranging from, but not limited to aerospace, automotive, motorsport, and UAV. For Met-L-Flo, Windform is a great option when a client needs production grade strength or better in a matter of days.

Here is a snapshot of Windform properties compared to other materials:

Chart

Tippy's Tips Icon xmas

Surviving The Holidays

1. Set a realistic budget:
Set a realistic holiday budget for gift giving. Presents do not have to be so costly that will break the bank. If you have a large family, drawing names for gift buying will reduce your cost and stress level.

2. The season of giving:
Volunteering time and/or donating items to charities is really rewarding. There are many food pantries that can use the help during the holidays (and all year long) ranging from food donation, to food prepping, to serving the food. Volunteering and donating is great for all ages. Get your little ones involved by donating last year’s toys to make room for the new toys that Santa will bring this year. There are many organizations that need volunteers such as Toys for Tots, Salvation Army Gift Giving, also many local fire/police stations donate gifts and will need presents wrapped.

3. Enjoy the spirit of the holidays:
After dinner load the family in the car and take a drive around your neighbor to look at the pretty lights your neighbors are displaying. While in the car you can play holiday music to enhance the experience. Spending quality time with the family can help you relax and enjoy the season. Remember it’s the little things in life.

4. Plan ahead:
Make a plan and try to stick to it. (Make sure to have plans B & C just in case)Set goals that are realistic for accomplishing tasks leading up to the big day. Spread the tasks over a few weeks, so you do not get overwhelmed.

5. Continue your daily routine:
Do not stop your overall normal routine.Continue to work out, sleep, take your vitamins, and eat healthy. This allows your body to function properly and have the energy to complete the extra tasks. It also helps keep you from over indulging at all those holiday gatherings.

6. Breathe:
Remember this time of year is about spending quality time with your family and friends. When things start to get stressful take a deep breath and remember what’s most important, you’re together!

From our Met-L-Flo family to yours, Happy Holidays!!

Benefits of Using Service Bureaus

As we all know, high end appliances are becoming more popular in our homes and as the housing market begins to turn around home owners will be requiring even more high end products. The big question for manufacturers always remains… how do we know the product is what the customer wants before going to manufacturing? In an effort to answer this question, appliance manufacturers analyze feedback gathered from market studies and consumer reviews. However, it is very expensive to produce a new refrigerator, dishwasher, stove, etc., each time they conduct a new product focus study. The most logical answer: prototyping. The majority of new appliance prototypes will require a large range of plastic parts that include, water clear parts (i.e. produce bins), parts with a metallic finish (i.e. door handles), and parts with specific paint colors (i.e. interior frame parts).

Since design centers are limited in the variety of parts they are able to produce, the manufacturer’s best choice becomes outsourcing to Met-L-Flo. We offer an extensive array of processes and finishes to satisfy a wide range of part specific requirements—water clear SLAs, polypro & ABS-like SLAs, SLS, FDM (parts out of ABS, PC, Ultem, PPSF & Nylon), and traditional casting & rotomolding with a range of materials, colors and textures to match injection or blow molded parts.

Real World Applications of 3D Printing

As one would expect—day in and day out—use of equipment takes its toll. Preventative maintenance programs are a must, but at the end of the day… sometimes things just break.

Recently, our liquid honing machine, started acting up. A honing machine looks a lot like a sand blast cabinet, but works through a combination of air pressure and water solution pressure. Great for plastics, this action is gentle and works well to clean up rough edges and leaves a nice consistent finish surface appearance.

Unfortunately, our honer was not functioning properly. At first we believed the air pressure was the culprit. However, after disassembly of the inbound air line, it was determined that the foot activated electrical solenoid which allows air passage was bad. The rubber diaphragm inside the solenoid had deteriorated from age. We got on the horn with the honer’s manufacturer in search of the solenoid. They located a solenoid for us and overnighted the piece. We received and immediately installed the part. The results were better, but still not 100%.

We moved to the water pressure side of the equation. The inbound water is supplied via a regular hook-up similar to that on your washing machine. However, that water is constantly regurgitated in the bottom hopper to ensure water and cutting media are mixed. The process is driven by an electric motor and a mechanical water pump. The inconsistent “surface appearance” of our parts lead us to believe the water pump was not performing its job. After disconnecting the water, air and electric, we began to disassemble the water pump. In short order, we identified the pump impeller had broken off the main shaft. Back on the horn with the manufacturer. The new complication became a 2 to 3 month wait for the new impeller—not an option. The honer is used several hours daily. One of the things I believe we do well at Met-L-Flo is find internal solutions. We decided to build our own impeller! Why not… it’s made out of plastic. With some estimated measurements and a little CAD magic, we were able to reverse engineer the part. Once we had the CAD, we were ready to build. We decided to build the part in our FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) machine for strength and durability.

While the part was being built, we cleaned up the pump body and chased all threads to insure an easy re-assembly with all new stainless steel hardware. Reassembly is now done and it’s time to test….

The results are excellent!

We can once again provide our customers with the quality parts that we are committed to deliver…

Honing group

President’s Message by Carl Dekker

We continue to see much advancement in the materials and equipment offered in the Additive Manufacturing/3D Printing space. The press is filled with new materials appearing regularly for many different technologies. Although not as sexy, there are also many usefully developments in the secondary tooling technologies. All of this progress combined with advanced applications continues to make every day an enjoyable challenge in this ever changing industry.

Above you’ll find, or already enjoyed, an article about applying Additive technologies to resolve an internal maintenance issue. Our production floor brought us the internal solution when the lead time for the replacement part was deemed unacceptable. Extensive training empowers our staff to identify and support the best solutions for our internal production needs, as well as, identifying our client’s and partner’s challenges. The more we understand about our partner’s needs, the more capable we are of implementing the best technology options. The implementation of today’s technologies builds the foundation for tomorrow’s solutions. We look forward to creating tomorrow’s solutions with all of our partners.

Finally, as you work hard to wrap up end of the year projects, remember to take some time to recharge and reflect on the past year. Please allow me a moment to extend my appreciation for the opportunity to work with each of you through the year. I wish you safe travels over the holidays as well as fun and relaxation with loved ones. We look forward to working with you in 2015!

Header pic

========================================================== Copyright © 2014 Met-L-Flo, Inc., All rights reserved. Newsletter Our mailing address is: 720 Heartland Drive, Unit S Sugar Grove, IL 60554

Met-L-Flo, Inc. Newsletter – OCTOBER 2014

Click here to view the fully formatted newsletter.

Puzzle2

Fall Fun

In what year did Americans celebrate two Thanksgivings?
A. 1800
B. 1815
C. 1939
D. 1962

Where did Jack O’lanterns originate?
A. Spain
B. America
C. Ireland
D. Germany

Thunder in the fall fortells what?
A. Warm winter
B. Raining fall
C. Cold winter
D. Hot summer

Please send your guesses/requests for the correct matches to:
newsletter@met-l-flo.com

If you’ve got an idea for a great trivia teaser, please submit it to the email above for possible inclusion in a future addition.

Answers from the last trivia:  America The Beautiful
1. What day did most of the signatures take place on the Declaration of Independence? A. August 2, 1776

2. What US President was born on 4th of July? B. Calvin Coolidge

3. How many other countries celebrate the 4th of July? (Bonus points if you can name them) B. 4 – Denmark, Norway, Sweden and England.

4. What year did congress vote the 4th of July a paid federal holiday in the US? A. 1938

5. How many US Presidents have died on the 4th of July? (Bonus points if you can name them) C. 3 – Thomas Jefferson, John Adams & James Monroe

Opening Our Doors

Here at Met-L-Flo we are always happy to open our doors to customers, students, and other interested parties to advance the general knowledge of our Industry. Additive Manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D Printing, is an ever evolving field and Met-L-Flo believes in participating in industry education.

On Friday, August 1, 2014, Met-L-Flo had the privilege of holding a BBQ and open house for some of our local customers. We appreciate everyone taking the time to come see our facility and interact with us. Throughout the event wonderful discussions were had about industry advancements, Met-L-Flo processes and most importantly direct solutions for customer programs.

Met-L-Flo, Inc. Open House
Met-L-Flo, Inc. Open House

On Tuesday, September 9, 2014, we had another opportunity to increase industry awareness. Met-L-Flo hosted a group of students through ASM International, the Materials Information Society and Northern Illinois University. The students were invited for a tour of our facility. After the tour, Carl Dekker, President of Met-L-Flo, gave a comprehensive power point presentation followed by lively discussion on the advantages of 3D Printing, and where the industry is forecasted to be within the next few years.

Due to the success of these events we are planning to continue opening our doors. Watch for your invitation soon.

The Skull

A few weeks back, Carl emailed a link to a Radiolab podcast article. The article provided links to 3D files for a Taung Skull, which Carl downloaded. Two days later, he handed me a tiny skull that we had built in our SLA labs.

It’s a fascinating listen. The narrators brought to life the 1920’s discovery of an ancient cave in Taung, South Africa. Geologist Raymond Dart painstakingly scraped away at a limestone rock until he found himself staring at a perfectly preserved face of a human child. To make this even more noteworthy, the preserved skull also reflected characteristics similar to that found in a chimpanzee.

Many times I find myself focusing on emerging tech and cutting edge design–this is the perfect melding of both. It’s incredible to hear how many individuals had a part in the little replica sitting before me. We want to thank everyone involved for their hard work.

Industry News

As additive manufacturing technology advances, the ability to use 3D printed parts for end production is becoming more and more accessible. Up to this point the majority of 3D printed/rapid parts have been mainly used for prototypes. One technology furthering these advances is Electron Beam Melting (EBM).

EBM is being used to produce metal parts 3-5 times faster than SLS, SLM and DMLS. The main advancement is in the melting process. With EBM the melting is done in a vacuum as the beam completely melts the particles to create a fully solid object, requiring minimal reworking compared to other additive manufacturing methods.

Due to their strength and heat tolerance, these parts are ideally suited for many industries, including auto, medical, and aerospace. We’d be happy to discuss your project with you to help determine which of our many processes is best suited for your application.

President’s Message by Carl Dekker

Autumn is upon us, and we are quickly reminded of all of the educational activities surrounding us. We are beginning to see a large number of activities aimed at training for 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing. Met-L-Flo supports educational activities through presentations at local venues, employing interns, and supporting educational organizations by contributing to their advisory boards. There is a lot of work to be done in this area and we are pleased to support such organizations as America Makes, N.I.U., RapidTech, and Edmonds C.C. that focus completely on education. It is our desire to do our part to educate interested parties while helping grow the industry.

We understand that these new technologies can be confusing to navigate. At Met-L-Flo we like to ask ‘what if’ to open new process possibilities to our customers. We have enjoyed helping many clients discover unanticipated solutions and look forward to helping many more. It is for this reason that we push our internal training programs to continue to expand. This expansion enables us to better suggest the right solution for your applications. Simply asking ‘what if…’ can be very enlightening and gratifying. Please partner with us on your prototyping, tooling and additive manufacturing projects. We have more solutions than you ever imagined.

Have a beautiful autumn as we continue to learn together!

========================================================== Copyright © 2014 Met-L-Flo, Inc., All rights reserved. Newsletter Our mailing address is: 720 Heartland Drive, Unit S Sugar Grove, IL 60554

Met-L-Flo President, Carl Dekker Is Interviewed by Advanced Manufacturing Insight

We are thrilled to share a Q&A Session with Carl Dekker and Advanced Manufacturing Insight. With their permission we are sharing it.

Carl at AMUG
Carl at AMUG

Interview with Carl Dekker, President of Met-L-Flo and Chair of ASTM’s F42

Carl Dekker of Met-L-Flo examines the challenges and opportunities posed by advanced manufacturing – the need for standards to create fluidity in the process of meeting customer needs.

Carl Dekker has served as the President and Owner of Met-L-Flo since 1991, and currently serves as the Chair of ASTM’s F42.  At Met-L-Flo, he has been actively involved in research and product development using current technologies and innovative methods of manufacturing.  He has served as Chairperson of SME’s Rapid Technologies and Additive Manufacturing community (RTAM), and currently serves as Chair of the Direct Digital Manufacturing Tech group of RTAM.  As Chair of ASTM’s F42, he is directly involved in the development and distribution of standards for the additive manufacturing industry.

AMI:   Could you quickly sketch out for me your company’s experience and involvement with additive manufacturing?

DEKKER:   I got into additive manufacturing back in 1989 when it was called rapid prototyping. In 1991 I joined Met-L-Flo and in 1995 we were servicing a lot of the service bureaus at that point in time, kind of behind the scenes.  We had enough contact with OEMs to justify bringing on our own equipment and we started developing services from there.  We are active in a lot of the different promotional activities if you will, different boards and things like that, trying to help get the word out there properly and correctly. We have just been trying to help develop standards at the same time because we are a service bureau and our motto is to be able to accept orders from our clients, produce parts and have them meet their specs when they get in there without having to go through an extensive amount of interpretation and understanding.

AMI:   What would you consider the biggest technology challenge facing your company’s activities in the additive space today?

DEKKER:   I suppose it would come down to an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) system that is functional for additive manufacturing.

AMI:   Is that something you would need for your internal purposes or for your customers to have?

DEKKER:   Primarily for internal purposes but obviously portals could be designed in also for purpose of customer interaction.  The key to it is the rate of information exchange and change is so fast that keeping it fluid, current, accurate and up to date from the client’s point of change or communication all the way through to the proper people on the floor is a very cumbersome area where there is always room for interpretation and miscommunication.

AMI:   Why is the situation so fluid?

DEKKER:   Because many times we’ll have customers that come through and tell us that piece did not pass the test they were running and now it has to be changed or modified. Or production comes back with something that they tried to build it to the client’s specs and are finding issues. They have suggested solutions that require interaction and dialogue with the client. Right now qualifying a part for additive manufacturing or a process to produce a part is a very lengthy, drawn out, years-long process.

AMI:   Can I ask what industrial sectors or verticals you have as your customer base?

DEKKER:   We primarily target additive manufacturing for end part application. A lot of it is primarily aerospace or defense related products, along with some industrial components, which are obviously far simpler from the stand point of qualification.

AMI:   Do you do health care? I have heard a lot of people say that’s an area where there is a lot of additive activity.

DEKKER:   We do so, but we’re not as big into health care as some of the other operations are. It’s just the nature of our client base.

AMI:   3 to 5 years in the future what do you think will be your biggest technology challenge?

DEKKER:   Probably management of process enhancement and repeatability controls.

AMI:   What do you find the biggest business challenge facing your company in this space today?

DEKKER:   Misperception by customers or potential customers. It’s the “print me a Stradivarius” “print me a firearm”. Printing firearms with 3D printed PLA materials or ABS materials should not even be under discussion. Any engineer would understand that the material science behind that is a recipe for disaster. But you start getting the publicity and the popularity that the term 3D printing has been given recently and all of a sudden everybody thinks that if somebody else could print a gun then anybody can print a gun and they all work, although that is not true. So there is many times when the funding that is authorizing the go ahead on programs may not necessarily understand what they are authorizing.

AMI:   In 3 to 5 years do you have any thoughts of what might be the biggest business challenge then?

DEKKER:   Probably scalability and process control or manufacturing repeatability.

AMI:   What do you wish that the companies that interact with your firm, I suppose either as suppliers or potentially as customers, understood better about the nature or constraints of your business?

DEKKER:   Very likely the fact that we probably handle a factor of 10 on the number of geometry and applications compared to what an engineer developing a product or a customer would be dealing with. Therefore common sense is not so common when you apply that broad of a brush to it. It starts getting difficult to get the interpretations clear, correct, and concise, and the communication as a consistently clear communication is a constant challenge.

AMI:   We have heard that computer aided design tools, because mostly they have been developed implicitly for other forms of manufacturing, really just don’t work well in this area. Do you agree with that statement and does it aggravates some of the problems you’ve talked about with communication?

DEKKER:   No, I think a lot of technologies are in place for manufacturing in the design space. There are enormous amount of design-enabled communication tools with the amount of data – not just physical representation of the file but how much can be attached within that file and the other digital representation of parts. If you process and send it in a very simple file like STL file format then you lose a lot of that data, and yes it becomes complicated but the bigger issue is making sure that information actually gets communicated across. I think that is a problem strictly because so many companies have different procedures for how they transmit and how they process and handle data. Not all of them are necessarily as savvy as others and sometimes a little piece of information can be missed and an email doesn’t quite communicate it very well.

AMI:   Is that one of the constraints, the need for great deal of clarity and exactly what you’re asking for?

DEKKER:   That’s part of it, whether that gets addressed by standards or it gets addressed by embedded data or addressed by open lines of communications. Right now it is still something that people need to consider before you just send the file and press print.

AMI:   Is there any segment of the whole ecosystem of additive manufacturing that you would like to understand better in the sense of what are their plans, goals, wishes, initiatives and possibly constraints and obstacles that would help you service them better?

DEKKER:   I would have to say a lot of it is the equipment manufacturers. I can completely respect the right and the need for patents and the protection that they provide, however, it also creates a very diverse set of capabilities that no longer becomes uniform to any one technology. A lot of these companies are not major, they are not Haas, they are not that size of manufacturer where they can go through and develop everything. So their resources are limited and the ability to interact and move their own technology forward is held by that. I think as their technology moves forward that will be a huge enabler to put the constraints that are needed for process repeatability and reliability for standards to develop and for buyers to procure products with less confusion.

AMI:   You spoke earlier about the development of standards and that you’re active in that. Are there any other areas like standards, i.e. areas where some kind of group action by multiple organizations in the space would speed the adoption and commercialization of additive technology?

DEKKER:   Workforce development training. Also process repeatability and reliability, and process control; followed by standards that can support and embrace that process control and repeatability.

AMI:   With any industry that’s growing as additive manufacturing and its allied services, the pace of innovation and development would generally require heavy amounts of capital. Do you agree with and if so where do you see this capital coming from?

DEKKER:   Yes I agree with that. It is a capital intensive environment. I see this capital probably coming from a lot of investment organizations and groups. I don’t necessarily mean start-ups but growth ventures, joint ventures and then again their used to be a lot of that growth that comes through maturation of the industry which would encompass and include mergers and acquisitions and things like that as well organic growth.

AMI:   Some people seem to anticipate something of a wave of consolidation so that bigger companies would be able to essentially foot the bill for various advances that need to take place. Do you agree with that forecast or you just think it will be more opportunistic as people achieve synergies?

DEKKER:   I think there are going to be some roll-ups but there will also be people looking to get out and people looking to get in. 5 years from now and, 10 years from now will it be as visible? I suppose that depends on where the prospects are, where the maturation level is and where the ability to move things forward is. I think we’ll see continued rate of change to some degree in the industry and a lot of that is strictly because of the fact that a lot of very good technologists – creative and inventive people – will come up with ideas and there will be others that have the funding to be able to make those ideas move to the next level. We’ve seen a lot of that before, it hasn’t been quite as visible and as public, but I don’t foresee it stopping.  Of course there are always people who will think they can jump on and take a quick ride. I guess you can have all measures in the spectrum but I see continued movement in the market if you will.

AMI:   There has been a good deal of discussion in the technology press about the problems that additive manufacturing may pose for intellectual property.  Are you or your organization concerned about any of this?

DEKKER:   It’s not our approach to target intellectual property or opportunities to engage in and leverage or develop our own internal intellectual property. We do develop a lot of our own processes and procedures and technologies to move things forward but not from the stand point of what can we do to secure intellectual property. I feel that the people who do have a lot of intellectual property invested in this arena or market space may very well have some issues.  While I think that’s one part of it, I think the designers and the intellectual product properties or intellectual property related to product, not specifically additive manufacturing, is the problem. The problem is the fact that you can now take and copy almost anything with just a scanner, some software, and a couple pieces of equipment. Buy one, make a hundred of them. How that intellectual property is going to be controlled, supported, and protected, is a much larger question than I can answer.

Obviously there are still some economic issues behind this. Just because you can print a cell phone cover doesn’t mean you will run out and buy a piece of equipment and then go see what free files you can get off the web to feed to this computer so that you can get a few thousand dollar cell phone cover case. That said it’s not that you couldn’t do that. The situation is more like the automotive manufacturers, they all buy their competitors’ vehicles and they tear them apart and see what they can find. Reverse engineering is a lot more feasible with 3D printing.

AMI:   We have heard that a lot of the innovations and techniques and approaches and materials come from all over in the additive manufacturing space, and that health care is a dynamic area. Are there any other industry verticals that you are particularly interested to track developments in?

DEKKER:   I think health care has an enormous potential. When I say health care I’m not talking products as in electronics and components and things like that. I’m talking more so of the variety of different devices that are patient specific and the number of different types of implants or dental devices, or anything that’s customized towards patients is an enormous market. So as you start taking into consideration those different avenues it is a huge opportunity and that’s not even going so far as to entering into the surgical rooms or any sort of procedures specific devices.

We’re looking into some of it but it’s not necessarily a specific area that we are targeted towards. We don’t have the certifications for health care type products, and we don’t have the procedures and everything for that so it’s not an area that we have made a focus of ours.

The key areas that we have mainly targeted are areas where direct manufacturing has an easy opportunity to fit and those being aerospace, military-type programs where you’ve got a low volume, high value added components.

AMI:   I’ve also had a lot of comparisons between adoption of additive manufacturing and the adoption of composite technologies by aerospace, do you think that’s a reasonable comparison?

DEKKER:   No, I think there will be faster adoption of additive manufacturing than composite.

AMI:   Are there other technologies whose history might serve as the better model?

DEKKER:   I’d like to say that computers somewhat with the technology advancements. I think we’re kind at the ground floor here still with what the total potentials are but I see an enormous amount of things converging on this from the ease of communication of information, the speed of processing power, the ability to define representation and electronic space, manipulation of that data, ability to apply calculations and formulas to optimize that data. There is a huge number of things that can really cause some explosion that are all coming together but how quickly they are going to come together is hard to say. The first computer took up an entire huge building. I think it was IBM that came out and said that nobody will ever want to have one of these things in their home. Now you can’t walk around without one in your pocket.

**This interview was originally published on Advanced Manufacturing Insight. It was also featured on Robotics Tomorrow.

Open House Poll

Met-L-Flo, Inc. Newsletter – June 2014

Header pic Met-L-Flo Trivia Section
Everyone needs a little fun in your workday! Here’s our trivia section to add some fun and competition to your day. We look forward to your responses.
America the Beautiful
1. What day did most of the signatures take place on the Declaration of Indepence?

A. August 2, 1776
B. July 4, 1776
C. September 8, 1776
D. July 19, 1776

2. What US President was born on 4th of July

A. Ronald Reagan
B. Calvin Coolidge
C. Dwight D. Eisenhower
D. John Adams

3. How many other countries celebrate the 4th of July? (Bonus points if you can name them)

A. 8
B. 4
C. 1
D. 6

4. What year did congress vote the 4th of July a paid federal holiday in the US?

A. 1938
B. 1941
C. 1976
D. 1921

5. How many US Presidents have died on the 4th of July? (Bonus points if you can name them)

A. 4
B. 6
C. 3
D. 7

Please send your guesses/requests for the correct matches to:
newsletter@met-l-flo.com
Answers from last trivia:
Ready for Spring?
1. Who coined the phrase, “April showers bring May Flowers”?
Thomas Tusser
2. What is the meaning behind “April showers brings May flowers”?
Patience
3. How did spring cleaning come about?
Coal that was used to heat the home during the winter got every where, and needed to be cleaned
4. When is the cut-off time for planting summer flowers and food, for the midwest?
End of May
If you’ve got an idea for a great trivia teaser, please submit it to the email above for possible inclusion in a future addition.


Met-L-Flo Spotlight:
Met-L-Flo is stepping up our presence in social media. It’s a great way to keep up to date on new technologies and developments within our industry and others. We look forward to interacting with our followers, sharing company events and information, interesting industry news, and plenty of photos. We hope you’ll add us to your social media network.

You can find us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, and our WordPress blog.

facebook twitter wordpress pinterest googleplus

 


 

Tippy the turtleTips from Tippy the turtle:
It’s time for Fourth of July celebrations – fireworks, a backyard barbecue, maybe a trip to the beach. Whatever you have planned, Met-L-Flo and the American Red Cross want you to enjoy your holiday. Here are some steps they can follow to assure the safety of your family and friends.

FIREWORKS SAFETY The safest way to enjoy fireworks is to attend a public fireworks show put on by professionals. Stay at least 500 feet away from the show. Many states outlaw most fireworks. If someone is setting fireworks off at home, they should follow these safety steps:
• Never give fireworks to small children, and always follow the instructions on the packaging.
• Keep a supply of water close by as a precaution.
• Make sure the person lighting fireworks always wears eye protection.
• Light only one firework at a time and never attempt to relight “a dud.”
• Store fireworks in a cool, dry place away from children and pets.
• Never throw or point a firework toward people, animals, vehicles, structures or flammable materials.
• Leave any area immediately where untrained amateurs are using fireworks.

Wondering if fireworks are legal in your state? Follow this link to find out… http://blog.usa.gov/post/54109217133/are-fireworks-legal-in-your-state

GRILLING SAFETY Every year people in this country are injured while using backyard charcoal or gas grills. Follow these steps to safely cook up treats for the backyard barbecue:
• Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use.
• Never grill indoors – not in your house, camper, tent, or any enclosed area.
• Make sure everyone, including the pets, stays away from the grill.
• Keep the grill out in the open, away from the house, the deck, tree branches, or anything that could catch fire.
• Use the long-handled tools especially made for cooking on the grill to keep the chef safe.
• Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignited.
• Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions when using grills.

BEACH SAFETY If someone’s visit to the shore includes swimming in the ocean, they should learn how to swim in the surf and only swim at a lifeguarded beach, within the designated swimming area. Obey all instructions and orders from lifeguards. Other safety tips include:
• Keep alert for local weather conditions. Check to see if any warning signs or flags are posted.
• Swim sober and always swim with a buddy.
• Have young children and inexperienced swimmers wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
• Protect the neck – don’t dive headfirst. Walk carefully into open waters.
• Keep a close eye and constant attention on children and adults while at the beach. Wave action can cause someone to lose their footing, even in shallow water.
• Watch out for aquatic life. Water plants and animals may be dangerous. Avoid patches of plants and leave animals alone.
Additional water safety tips are available at http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/water-safety

SUN PROTECTION Limit exposure to direct sunlight between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., and wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a protection factor of at least 15. Reapply sunscreen often. Remember to drink plenty of water regularly, even if not thirsty. Avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine in them. Protect the eyes by wearing sunglasses that will absorb 100 percent of UV sunlight. Protect the feet – the sand can burn them and glass and other sharp objects can cut them.
During hot weather, watch for signs of heat stroke—hot, red skin; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing. If it’s suspected someone is suffering from heat stroke:
• Call 9-1-1 and move the person to a cooler place.
• Quickly cool the body by applying cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin (or misting it with water) and fanning the person.
• Watch for signs of breathing problems and make sure the airway is clear. Keep the person lying down.

DOWNLOAD FIRST AID APP Another thing you can do is download the free Red Cross first aid app which puts expert advice for everyday emergencies at your fingertips. The app is available for direct download from the Apple or Google Play for Android app stores.
http://www.redcross.org/mobile-apps/first-aid-app


Met-L-Flo’s Show Updates:

AMUG:
Additive Manufactures Users Group (AMUG) is an industry-wide users group that provides its members with a forum for learning and establishing professional connections. MET-L-FLO has been participating in AMUG shows for close to 20 years
and would like to extend the invitation to you. Anyone who is involved in the additive manufacturing industry is always a welcome addition. Next year’s AMUG is being held in Jacksonville, Florida April 19 through April 22, 2015.
AUVSI:

An Exhibitor list that included Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman along with 600 international companies and an attendance of over 6,000 helped make the 2014 AUVSI show in Orlando, FL a great success for Met-L-Flo…..so much so, that we’ve already reserved our spot for the 2015 show in Atlanta, GA! Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) is a non-profit organization focused on unmanned systems and robotics. The advancement in prototype materials has opened the door for use of AM materials on flight hardware. It’s no surprise that “drone” was the buzzword of the show this year as everyone was talking about what’s out there now and what will be available shortly. Hopefully we’ll see you there in 2015.

Rapid:

The Rapid conference took place in “The Motor City” this year and Met-L-Flo wouldn’t miss it! Met-L-Flo has been involved with the Rapid Conference for many years and it seems to get better every year. The attendance is great and the many different sessions are extremely informative. There are always new machines being unveiled and talked about at this conference, so if that’s what you seek…….get over to the Rapid Conference next year in Long Beach, Ca!


Ramping up for the Rapid:
One of the most anticipated events at the Rapid conference is always the “puzzle”. For several years the conference has sponsored a 3D printing contest for students to design a part that can be broken into several pieces and then assembled by the attendees of the show.

This year’s contest winners were Western Illinois University students, Scottie Waldhaus and Darren Walker. After their design was chosen it was validated by Met-L-Flo and the pieces were assigned to 9 different show exhibitors to produce in various processes encouraging attendees to engage exhibitors in order to discover who has the pieces at their booths. This year’s collaborating exhibitors were American Precision Prototyping, C-Ideas, Envision TEC, Harvest Technologies, Materialize, Rapid Prototype + Manufacturing, Roush Manufacturing, Stratasys and Met-L-Flo. Pieces were created in the SLA, SLS, PolyJet, and Photopolymer processes. Here at Met-L-Flo we all got in on the fun…


Up Coming Events:
MET-L-FLO has always worked toward facilitating education by presenting industry intelligence at conferences, schools, client visits, and on the web. Now we are looking to make that education more personal and closer to home, so close that we are holding a open house lunch and learn right here at our own facility. Our first open house will be the 1st of August here in Sugar Grove!
This open house will have educational presentations and tours. The presentations will be tailored to differing levels of expertise as defined by the audience. We will be asking registrants for what information they would like to hear. Watch for a Save the Date annoucement later this week.
We will be including a collection of items to help communicate and illustrate the talking points. We will also be doing a drawing for door prizes and gift cards. Hopefully you will be able to join us for this exciting event. If you have special requests, please let us know and we will try to address them as well.


President’s Message:
Summer is always an excellent time to get together with family and friends. Here at Met-L-Flo we look forward to those times as well. We hope that you will be able to make precious memories this summer that you can carry with you for a life time.
May all of your travels and outings be safe and enjoyable. We look forward to sharing stories so all the memories may keep you warm even in those unpleasant cold months. Best wishes for a safe and memorable summer!
Carl Dekker
President
MET-L-FLO Inc.


We’d love to know what other subject matter would be beneficial for you in future editions. Please send your ideas and suggestions to newsletter@met-l-flo.com

MET-L-FLO INC. 720 Heartland Drive Unit S Sugar Grove, IL 60554
Telephone 1-800-MET-L-FLO 630-409-9860 Fax 630-409-9869
Email: support@met-l-flo.com